maxtaroisheretoo:

Times are changing…

virtuosovillain:

"The most important keyword to me was ‘train’ and the structure of the narrative reflects that. It’s simple: Curtis travels from the very last section of the train to the front. So the different carriages represent different stages in the story – every time you enter a new car, it’s like a new world that the characters are experiencing." 

– Joon-ho Bong on the design of the train cars.

The idea of the train is also very The Wire-esque as far as trains being cyclical in nature and how this particular train representing the system “never stops”.

rabioheab:

the people who make lyric videos on youtube are the backbone of this nation

chasexjackson:

worthyourweightinfanfiction:


sparseparsley:

swing-set-in-december:

regular-lord-joesus:

kummersaurus:

crying because 50 shades of grey



fifty shades of awful



JUST SAY IT

50 Shades is a lot more interesting if you convince yourself that “there” means “my feet”

chasexjackson:

worthyourweightinfanfiction:

sparseparsley:

swing-set-in-december:

regular-lord-joesus:

kummersaurus:

crying because 50 shades of grey

image

fifty shades of awful

image

JUST SAY IT

50 Shades is a lot more interesting if you convince yourself that “there” means “my feet”

Sincerity seems to be a problem today. But I prefer to be hated than to be false and fool people. -Kristen Stewart.

(Source: kriswinchesterwho)

Just watch them over and over until you understand every moment of it and become a higher level of human. Or read endless recaps of the episodes, like I do…

Good advice! Haha

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK
We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.
Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”
Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

image

Did you guess yet?

image

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

image

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

image

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

imageHave you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

image

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

  

burgertv:

"I’m good at sex, you’re bad at sex."

Decided to finish up Battlestar Galatica season 4. I think it says a lot that the last episode I saw was about 2 months ago and then I had to take a break. It’s not necessarily that this last season is bad or anything but nothing seems all that compelling. That’s strange considering this is the final season of a show that started off so strongly with the first three seasons.

I’m all caught up on Mad Men and I don’t know what to do with myself until next year…

CARPENTER: I had a research screening of The Thing - I showed this film to a bunch of teenagers, and one teenage girl, fourteen years old, she said, ‘Well, what happened in the end? When the two men were sitting out in the snow?’ And I said, ‘Well, that’s part of the nature of the story, you have to use your imagination,’ and she says, ‘Oh, I hate that.’
ATKINS: I paid you five dollars for this—
TUTTLE: For you to tell me what to think!
CORMAN: The audience, whether it’s in a motion picture or a book, must participate with the artist. So part of it comes from the artist, and there is a feedback and a response from the audience. And that girl, I would hope, is a very minor point of the audience.
BARKER: I think she’s a growing part of the audience. I think that’s part of the banality of the culture, the spoonfed element of the culture. Young people are asked to use their imaginations less and less—and you know, in a way, we do a wretched thing to them. We teach them the reality of Santa Claus and Neverneverland up until the age of five, and then we tell them at the age of five, ‘That was all lies, here’s the gross natural product of Chile,’ and we’ve got this very bland, 1999 vision of the world, we’ve got a place in which imagination has been scoured, not just from the five-year-old, but from the whole culture.
myresortofawesomeness:

theexorcist:

Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.
Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight! 
After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.
His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.
In 1984, Smith began offering training through his advanced make-up course and has mentored some of the biggest names in the industry, from Oscar winning make-up artists Stan Winston, Greg Cannom and Rick Baker (who’s first professional job was assistant to Smith on The Exorcist), to directors Guillermo del Toro and J. J. Abrams.
Smith was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with a retrospective tribute in 2009, and two years later he became the first make-up artist to receive an Honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement at the Governor’s Awards (watch Linda Blair’s speech here, and Smith’s emotional acceptance here).
With an astonishing career spanning over 60 years, Dick Smith’s timeless body of work, passion and generosity has influenced many and will continue to inspire for generations to come.
Rest in peace, "The Godfather of Make-Up."

RIP

myresortofawesomeness:

theexorcist:

Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.

Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight!

After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.

His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.

In 1984, Smith began offering training through his advanced make-up course and has mentored some of the biggest names in the industry, from Oscar winning make-up artists Stan Winston, Greg Cannom and Rick Baker (who’s first professional job was assistant to Smith on The Exorcist), to directors Guillermo del Toro and J. J. Abrams.

Smith was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with a retrospective tribute in 2009, and two years later he became the first make-up artist to receive an Honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement at the Governor’s Awards (watch Linda Blair’s speech here, and Smith’s emotional acceptance here).

With an astonishing career spanning over 60 years, Dick Smith’s timeless body of work, passion and generosity has influenced many and will continue to inspire for generations to come.

Rest in peace, "The Godfather of Make-Up."

RIP

tongue-toyed:

i never really liked

my name

much

until i found out

what it tastes like

when you write it in frosting

on top of a cake

(Source: your-scallywag)